Chaos

This week’s Photo Challenge at WordPress is Chaos.  Here hundreds of blue-footed boobies and pelicans attack a bait ball in the Galapagos Islands.  There birds were diving constantly, splashing, screeching, and gorging.  Pelicans got so full of fish they were unable to take off again. See more depictions of CHAOS at the WordPress challenge site. Travel safe.  Have fun. Advertisements

Weekly Photo Challenge: Between

Wherever there is three, one is always BETWEEN, which is the theme for this week’s photo challenge from WordPress.  Here these three blue-footed boobies (Kongo calls this image Tres Amigos) perch on a rock in the Galapagos Islands.  The two on the ends look at the one between.  See more of Kongo’s Galapagos images here.

Snail Mail From the Galapagos

There’s a tradition on the Galapagos Islands about mail delivery.  Hundreds of years ago someone from a whaling ship set up a barrel in a place now called Post Office Bay to act as a mailbox.  Ships could drop mail off there with the hope that some other passing ship heading home would pick up their correspondence and deliver it.  Ships inbound to the islands would drop off mail destined for crews that were still in the islands.  It was a good system that worked well.  It still works!

So, This Iguana Walks Into A Bar …

The land iguanas in the Galapagos are fierce looking but they won’t hurt you.  While their prehistoric appearance may startle you at first they tend to grow on you and pretty soon you’ll be saying “Iguana love you forever…” to your honey after an island outing.  Really.  And if that line doesn’t work you can always try (not recommended by the monkey) telling her that you do not suffer from “a reptile dysfunction.”  I know.  I know.  Read on for the bar joke.

Galapagos Swallow-tailed Gull

The Swallow-tailed Gull found on the Galapagos Islands is truly an interesting bird.  Aside from their red eyes and hooked beak, these birds are the only true seabird that is nocturnal.  The red eye rim indicates the bird is in breeding season, which at the Galapagos Islands is pretty much year round.  Another interesting thing about these gulls is that their eyes are larger than any other species of gull.  This is to give them better night vision when hunting squid and small fish that come to the surface at night to feed on plankton.